Cefr Agreement

A recent paper by Macdonald and Vandergrift[38] assesses the following similarities (for oral skills) between the Levels of the Public Service Commission and the PRE levels: there are six stages: A1, A2, B1, B2, C1, C2. These are described in the table below. Canada is increasingly using PRE in some areas. Tests compatible with the PRE will be carried out, such as the DELF/DALF (French) and the DELE (Spanish). Universities are increasingly structuring their curricula around DUR levels. Larry Vandergrift of the University of Ottawa proposed the Canadian acquisition of PRE in his report Proposal for a Common Framework of Reference for Languages for Canada, published by Heritage Canada. [32] [33] This report compares PRE to other standards used in Canada and provides an equivalency table. The Common European Framework of Reference for Languages: Learning, Teaching, Assessment[1], abbreviated in English as GER, CEF or GER, is a directive describing the performance of foreign language learners across Europe and, increasingly, in other countries. It was developed by the Council of Europe as a main part of the project “Language Learning for European Citizenship” between 1989 and 1996.

Their main objective is to establish a method of learning, teaching and assessment that applies to all languages in Europe. In November 2001, the Council of the European Union recommended that the PRE be used to set up systems for the validation of language skills. The six reference levels (A1, A2, B1, B2, C1, C2) are widely accepted as the European standard for scoring a person`s language skills. The GER methodology has been extended to describe and assess users` knowledge of programming languages when the programming activity is considered a linguistic activity. [99] The Common European Framework of Reference divides learners into three main subdivisions that can be divided into six stages. For each level, it describes what a learner needs to know how to do by reading, listening, speaking, and writing. . . .