Ec Mutual Recognition Agreement

These agreements benefit regulators by reducing double inspections in any other area, allowing for a greater focus on higher-risk sites, and expanding inspection coverage of the global supply chain. The text of the Protocol on the mutual recognition of conformity assessment results is part of the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) between Canada, of the one part, and the European Union and its Member States, of the other part, the Agreement ensures that Swiss manufacturers and conformity assessment bodies of the products covered by the Agreement have, as far as possible, the same access to the UNION market as their EU or EEA competitors. MRA reduces the time and cost of marketing products in foreign markets. The agreement contributes to the removal of important technical barriers to trade, on the one hand by confirming the harmonisation of the technical rules of Switzerland and the EU and, on the other hand, by eliminating the need for two conformity assessments, since a conformity assessment is sufficient to access the Swiss and Community markets. Such an assessment may be carried out by a conformity assessment body recognised under the Agreement, in accordance with Swiss or European technical rules. On the one hand, industry and government institutions of international standards bodies are striving to establish common and universal technical rules (e.g. B CEN/CENELEC and ETSI at European level, ISO/IEC and ITU at international level); on the other hand, states interact directly (e.g. Β the European Community with third countries) in order to achieve mutual recognition of their conformity assessment procedures. This last point is particularly important where it has not been possible to agree on common rules or where it will not be possible, for other reasons, to draw up such rules in the near future. Recognition as a conformity assessment body can be applied for from the Federal Network Agency for Electricity, Gas, Telecommunications, Post and Railways (formerly the Telecommunications and Postal Regulatory Authority).

See, in this context, Official Journal No 19/2001 of the regulatory authority, page 2950, Communication No 555/2001. This also explains why recognition regimes are fundamentally similar, but they vary considerably not only from country to country, but also from sector to sector within a single country (e.g. telecommunications, VMM, electrical safety, medical equipment, food, pressure vessels, etc.). . . . .