Litton

Litton

Litton, meaning village on a roaring stream or torrent, has a tiny village green.

Crystal Beck and Potts Beck pour off the hills to the north of the river, and the Foss (force or waterfall) to the south. Old Litton snuggles below the Foss. Now just one farmhouse and the remains of another called Spital Croft, (from hospitality) which provided shelter for monks coming from Sawley or Fountains. Most of Litton lines the present road, the Queen’s Arms, the Post Office, the old post office, farm houses and their converted barns.

The Post Office is now in a modern house on the site of three miners’ cottages whose name, Park Bottom reminds us that much of Litton was once a deer park. There are stepping stones across the river on the footpath to Arncliffe, a ford, a wooden footbridge down a path from the green and an old stone bridge called New Bridge down a little lane off the road up to Halton Gill leading to the old monks road. Between these crossings the roaring torrent though it still roars underground. Soon after heavy rain the water creeps gently back over the dry riverbed, an intriguing sight for those lucky enough to catch it.